Kosovo Assembly approved Belgrade-Pristina pre-agreed deal under tensions

PRISTINA: Assembly of Kosovo approved the pre-agreed deal, which was reached between the Prime Ministers of Serbia and Kosovo, on 20 April in Brussels, during tenth session of intermediation...

PRISTINA: Assembly of Kosovo approved the pre-agreed deal, which was reached between the Prime Ministers of Serbia and Kosovo, on 20 April in Brussels, during tenth session of intermediation negotiations from EU.

Vedat Xhymshiti | between THE frontlines

Kosovo’s PM Hashim Thaçi on Sunday had called an emergency session for the purpose of ratifying the verbal agreement, which substantially provides autonomy for northern Kosovo Serbs, who want at all costs to join Serbia, along with the territory which is pre-dominated by Serbs in Kosovo’s north bank, which has been and remains out of control and the law of the Kosovo constitution, now thirteen years.
With the confirmed presence of ninety-five members of parliament of Kosovo under physical and mental pressure from opposition party MPs ‘Self-Determination’, Kosovo MPs voted in favor of the agreement with eighty-nine members, five were against and one abstained.
‘Vetevendosje supporters, are gathering outside Kosovo’s assembly building to protest against the agreement.
Serbia’s ruling parties yesterday said they will support an agreement to normalise relations with breakaway Kosovo that could end years of tensions and put both states on a path to European Union membership.
The prime ministers of Serbia and Kosovo reached the tentative EU-mediated deal on Friday.
A report prepared for the summit on the progress achieved by the fractious neighbours in advancing towards European goals and values was to have been released Tuesday but was delayed to give the Wednesday face-to-face a chance. A refusal by Serbia to strike a deal could indefinitely delay its integration into the EU.
Pristina, which unilaterally declared independence from Belgrade in 2008, is for its part eyeing an association pact with the EU as a reward for normalising ties.
Five EU countries Cyprus, Greece, Romania, Slovakia and Spain, like Belgrade refuse to recognise Kosovo’s independence despite its recognition by some 100 nations, including the United States.
Parallel structures
The situation has been exacerbated by the fact that Serbs, who live in northern Kosovo, are increasingly ignoring the authority of Belgrade. They are determined to hold their own political and social life organized by them, although Belgrade has recently advised them against doing so, and Pristina is not willing to use any means that would aim to bring back public order in its northern region.
The problem of northern Kosovo is primarily a political one. For 13 years, North Mitrovica has been governed by Serbian political and economic structures that are financed by Belgrade. The EU’s Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo, EULEX, has little influence in the north of Kosovo.
Kosovo Serbs, backed by Belgrade, reject Kosovo’s 2008 secession and effectively live as if still part of Serbia. Belgrade lost control of Kosovo in 1999 when NATO bombed Serbia to halt the killing and expulsion of ethnic Albanians by Serb forces fighting a two-year counter-insurgency war.

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