Protests at Kosovo-Serbia ties

Kosovo police used pepper spray and batons to disperse a crowd of several hundred hardliner opposition supporters who tried to stop lawmakers from holding a vote in support of...
Kosovo police used pepper spray and batons to disperse a crowd of several hundred hardliner opposition supporters who tried to stop lawmakers from holding a vote in support of a deal with Serbia. However, supporters of ‘Vetendosje’ political party in Pristina who opposed Kosovo’s negotiation with Serbia including Ahtisaari’s plan on which bases Kosovo is already recognized by now 100 states, used teargas canisters, stones as well as liquid color with aim to disperse Kosovo Police in riot gear today.

Vedat Xhymshiti | between THE frontlines

Authorities in Pristina confirmed they detained over sixty protestors and they claim that their police members were exposed to several light injuries.
©Vedat Xhymshiti/ZUMAPRESS.com
U.S Embassy representative body in Pristina reportedly was under attack. The American diplomatic body based in Pristina is well known for political interferences in Kosovo’s internal and foreign policies. Kosovo is under the rule of a Madam president whose name popped out of an envelope which was brought by the former U.S ambassador to Pristina Christopher Dell, as this gentlemen is also well known on his ‘duty’ of attempt to violate the freedom of expression as well as the freedom of press in Kosovo.
The protest was also joined by the head of the Kosovo’s Islamic newest political subject ‘LISBA’, this is resulting with the recent debates over the head scarfs of the Kosovo’s young ladies who are not allowed to wear them while in public schools. Kosovo’s ‘Vetevendosje’ leader Albin Kurti showed his support over the headscarf (hijab) issue.
Security intervened and removed several opposition members who scuffled with the speaker of the Parliament in an attempt to prevent the deal being put to vote. The agreement does not resolve the dispute over Kosovo’s 2008 secession from Serbia. Serbia does not recognize Kosovo’s statehood.

Kosovo is a former province of Serbia that broke away to form an independent state after a 1998-99 war in which Serbs were accused of expulsions and random killings of ethnic Albanians, who make up 92 percent of Kosovo’s population. NATO bombed Serbian targets for two months in response. 

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