Kosovo Students Protest High Electricity Invoice

“The prices of electricity are growing, tickets for Hungary are falling”, was one of the protesters held banners on Monday. Some 200 people joined the protest led by the...

“The prices of electricity are growing, tickets for Hungary are falling”, was one of the protesters held banners on Monday.

NATO personnel observe students protesting in front of KEDS facilities, on Monday, January 12, 2015 in Pristina, Kosovo's capital city. (THE Frontliner/Corbis Picture by Vedat Xhymshiti)

NATO personnel observe students protesting in front of KEDS facilities, on Monday, January 12, 2015 in Pristina, Kosovo’s capital city. (THE Frontliner/Corbis Picture by Vedat Xhymshiti)

Some 200 people joined the protest led by the Student Political Club and supported by locals and civil society organisations. Students from the University of Pristina gathered in front of the offices of Kosovo’s electricity distributor, KEDS, on Monday in a show of discontent over rising consumer bills.

It was organised in response “to the difficult economic situation in Kosovo, especially the large increases in electricity prices,” said Fitim Salihu, one of the club chairman.

The students vowed to continue protesting until their demands for lower electricity prices and increased transparency, were met.

Kosovo stands among Europe’s poorest countries with millionaire politicians immersed in crime. A third of the workforce is unemployed and corruption is rife. About two out of three under the age of 25th are currently jobless, and nearly 50% of Kosovo’s 1.8 million people are considered to be poor.

Over twelve-thousands Kosovars fled the country due to heavy financial crisis, which is there due to systematic instalment of organised crime and corruption inside country’s public administration, which according to NATO and several other leaked documents, it is heavily backed from some of the powerful western authorities. One Kosovo Albanian was found frozen-dead across the borderline in Hungary in an attempt to trans-pass illegally towards Europe’s uncertain future.

Kosovo unilaterally declared independence from Serbia in 2008. It has been recognised by the US and many EU countries. Nato peacekeepers have been in Kosovo since 1999 and have failed to distribute their fully mandate to provide a peaceful, safe and secured environment for everyone, especially in the country’s northern bank that is immersed in violence and outlawed actions from the pro-Serbia’s separatist armed militants.

EU Mission Rule of Law operates as the descendant (shadow) of the United Nations Mission in Kosovo, under UN SC Resolution 1244, which guarantees Serbia’s territorial integrity over Kosovo, and many times proved that it is ready to move-on with the so known selective justice. Recent revelations from its British prosecutor Maria Bamieh, opened documented allegations that the EU mission rule of law, actually is a mission that rules the underworld and apparently a mission that encourage organised crime instead of fighting it.

NATO intervened in 1999 with 78 days of air strikes against Serbia, trying to halt the massacre and ethnic cleansing of Kosovo Albanians by Serbian forces waging counter-insurgency.


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